UMP (Unified Media Platform)

13.2 Viewing Log Files

 

Many devices which provide partially similar functionality do not provide facilities to monitor or debug the individual functions of the device. The UMP devices are almost unique in the sense that they provide full detailed logging for practically all the device’s functions and, if desired, can produce highly verbose debug output.

 

The device’s log files are listed in the Logs section of the Web Interface. By default the ‘ump.log’ file will be loaded in the log viewer with a 22 line output, though you can select any one of the log files from the Log File drop down menu on the left side above the main textbox.

 

Below is a brief overview of the available log files. Please note that these logs will display extremely verbose output, if configured, about the Python scripts that are responsible for most of the device’s functionality. Python is a very flexible, well known programming language and its entire functionality goes beyond the scope of this document. Although no Python knowledge or experience is required to use this device, it can help while trying to understand the logfile’s output. For more information on Python, visit the official documentation at http://python.org.

 

This information may appear complicated, and is only provided for advanced users or when you need to contact UMP support.

 

cache-103.log

This logfile displays the Media Cache helper’s activities and the resulting effects. It should always be present in this list. Check this logfile if rebuilding the cache fails or misses items.

commdetectserver-103.log

This logfile displays the Commercial Detection server’s progress and output. It should always be present in this list. Check this logfile if commercial detection fails.

encodingserver-103.log

This logfile displays the Encoding server’s progress and output. It should always be present in this list. Check this logfile if re-encoded videos contain faults or when there are problems with re-encoding.

main-103.log

This logfile displays the OSD’s progress and output. It should always be present in this list. Check this logfile in case of anomalies in the OSD. Even if the error relates to another service, it’s recommended to look here first.

recordserver-103.log

This logfile displays the Recording server’s progress and output. It should always be present in this list. Check this logfile if recordings don’t take place, or recorded videos contain faults.

 


 

13.2 Viewing Log Files (continued)

 

Below is a continuation of the logfile overview presented on the previous page.

 

 

schedulefavorites-103.log

This logfile displays the ‘schedule_favorites’ helper’s progress and output. It should always be present in this list. Check this logfile if recordings don’t take place.

tv_grab-103.log

This logfile displays the ‘tv_grab’ helper’s progress and output. It should always be present in this list once the EPG has been updated. Check this logfile if there are problems with the EPG functionality.

ump.log

This logfile represents a filtered but comprehensive overview of the device’s startup sequence and regular tasks such as updating the EPG or synchronizing the time with an NTP server on the Internet.

webconfig-103.log

This logfile displays a changelog of the device’s main configuration file. It should always be present in this list once any configuration has been performed in the web interface. It can be helpful when trying to trace back a setting that caused an error or other unexpected behavior. Simultaneously, it can also provide a reference as to when which settings were changed in a multi-user environment.

webserver-103.log

This logfile displays the progress and output of the device’s web service. It should always be present in this list. Check this file in case of errors in the web interface.

 

Additionally, there are a number of logfiles which are generated when specific tasks or applications are executed. If debugging is enabled, every MPlayer instance, game emulator and even some of the Helpers and Commands will produce logfiles, allowing you to examine their progress and output. A few examples of these logfiles are listed on the next page.

 

Some of these include a long number, indicated as ‘[…]’ in the examples, which is the UNIX time notation of the time and date when the process was initiated. The UNIX timestamp is a unified way of expressing time and date by a number of seconds elapsed since an arbitrary event, the beginning of the UNIX epoch, which corresponds to the 1st of January, 1970, according to the Gregorian calendar. The UMP’s Linux operating system also uses the UNIX timestamp.

 

For more information on the UNIX timestamp, see its Wikipedia article at: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Unix_timestamp.

 

13.2 Viewing Log Files (continued)

 

Another common UNIX convention is the use of the file descriptors STDERR and STDOUT. You may have also heard of STDIN, though it is not relevant for the output of an application or command. If you are already acquainted with these conventions you can skip this section. For the purpose of this explanation, you can consider STDERR and STDOUT as ‘channels’, where an application can ‘send’ its output. Generally, STDERR is used for errors and STDOUT is used for regular logging and output. When a command or application is launched it will almost always create both a STDERR and STDOUT logfile. If there are no (serious or critical) errors, the STDERR file should remain empty.

 

Below is a list of other logfiles that are not necessarily present in all configurations.

 

command-stderr-103-[...].log

These logfiles indicate a command’s errors when launched from the Commands menu in the OSD.

command-stdout-103-[...].log

These logfiles indicate a command’s output and progress when launched from the Commands menu in the OSD.

dosbox-stderr-103-[...].log

These logfiles indicate DOSbox’s errors when launched from the Games menu in the OSD.

dosbox-stdout-103-[...].log

These logfiles indicate DOSbox’s output and progress when launched from the Games menu in the OSD.

recorderstderr.log

This logfile indicates any anomalies or messages during a recording. Note that the recording server log should list these events, and this logfile should remain empty.

recorderstdout.log

This logfile indicates any errors which occurred during a recording. Note that the recording server log should list these events, and this logfile should remain empty.

mame-stderr-103-[…].log

These logfiles indicate a MAME’s errors when launched from the Games menu in the OSD.

mame-stdout-103-[…].log

These logfiles indicate a MAME’s output when launched from the Games menu in the OSD.

makelogos-103.log

This logfile indicates the progress and result of the ‘makelogos’ Helper script which retrieves the logos for the selected channels in the EPG.

makestationlist-103.log

This logfile indicates the progress and result of the ‘makestationlist’ Helper script which builds a list of TV channels for the TvTime application

 


 

13.2 Viewing Log Files (continued)

 

Below is the continuation of logfile listing mentioned on the previous page.

 

mplayer-stderr-103-[…].log

These logfiles indicate MPlayer’s errors when launched from the OSD.

mplayer-stdout-103-[…].log

These logfiles indicate MPlayer’s output and progress when launched from the OSD.

psX-stderr-103-[….].log

These logfiles indicate psX’s output and progress when launched from the Games menu in the OSD.

psX-stdout-103-[….].log

These logfiles indicate psX’s errors when launched from the Games menu in the OSD.

videothumb-103.log

This logfile is created if the ‘video_thumbnail’ Helper is started. It indicates the progress and results of the thumbnail creation process.

zsnes-stderr-103-[…].log

These logfiles indicate zSNES’s errors when launched from the Games or Commands menu in the OSD.

zsnes-stdout-103-[…].log

These logfiles indicate zSNES’s output and progress when launched from the Games or Commands menu in the OSD.

 

To view any one of these logfiles, select it from the Log File drop down menu. Note that logfiles containing a timestamp are logs that will only be used for the output of that particular instance of the application. If it is launched again afterwards, it will create a new log file with a new timestamp.

 

Above the main textbox with the logging information there are a number of controls which are explained below.

 

-         Refresh: This refreshes the currently selected logfile without reloading the entire page.

-         Refresh Delay: This allows you to specify after how many seconds a logfile should be refreshed automatically.

-         Rows: Here you can specify how many rows should be displayed.

 

Because logfiles tend to accumulate after a while of usage, you can clear out all the temporary log files, while leaving the main logs intact by selecting ‘log_cleaner’ under Plugins -> Helpers in the Web Interface.

 

It is recommended to make a copy of the relevant logfile output if an error is determined. Please note that UMP support may ask for a copy of the device’s log files to assess the cause or nature of the problem.